Winemaking

Winemaking

The grapes, carefully picked and transported to the winery, are de-stemmed and subsequently crushed and pressed by means of a pneumatic press that squeezes the berries gently to allow for the easy extraction of the juice. This technique aims at preserving the highest possible quality level and is commonly used for grapes destined for sparkling wine.

The must is then cooled and conveyed to stainless steel tanks where the first fermentation takes place. In ten days, the fermentation allows the natural grape sugars to transform, with the help of a selected strain of yeasts, into ethanol. After fermentation is complete, the wine is stored in tanks and left to rest until the next step.
The secondary fermentation is carried out, following the Martinotti-Charmat method, in stainless steel pressure tanks under controlled temperature and lasts for about 30 days. During this step, thanks to the addition of new selected yeasts, the residual sugars convert again into alcohol until the average alcoholic strength reaches about 11% vol. In this pressurized environment, the carbon dioxide generated during this fermentation remains within the autoclave and fully integrates with the wine, thus making it sparkling.

After the secondary fermentation, the wine is stabilized and left on the lees for a period ranging from 30 to 60 days at the winemaker’s discretion. The contact with the lees allows the wine to develop distinctive, elegant aromas.

After a final filtration, the wine is stored at low temperature in stainless steel tanks until bottling time.